Writing Multiple Drafts Of A PhD Dissertation

What you need to do prior to writing the first draft

Prior to writing your first draft of your PhD dissertation, it is important that you are prepared properly. You need to outline any sections that you wish to include in your PhD dissertation, as well as understanding what it is that you may wish to include within each of these sections.

Once you have a rough idea of how you wish for your paper to look, you can start planning a timetable for doing the work. Included in this timetable should be sufficient time to carry out your research. In fact, the research element of the paper is going to be one of the most important aspects, so it can be worth taking time to plan out each research method as well.

Things to include in the first draft

Once you’ve prepared the work and carried out the research, it can be time to start writing the first draft. It is important to realize that you would not necessarily write the first draft all in one go. In fact, it is quite likely that you will write, and re-write, certain sections first, before writing further sections, such as an abstract. This means that you may not right work in the order in which the final work is laid out; instead, the work will be written in a way which makes it easier to write all the sections to as high a quality as possible.

In the first draft, you may wish to include as much information as possible, as long as it is relevant. Even if the work does not remain in the final draft, having it written on paper can help to inspire other ideas, as well as ensure that the standard of the work is as high as possible.

How subsequent drafts can improve your PhD dissertation

In the subsequent drafts of your PhD dissertation, you may wish to include any new information, as well as removing any unnecessary information that you may have included in previous drafts. Furthermore, you may adapt the writing so that it flows more easily and makes more sense.

What you need to do once you have completed the final draft

Once you are happy with the work, you will then need to edit and proofread it. Editing can help ensure that the message that you are trying to get across is as effective as possible; whilst proofreading can help to eliminate any unnecessary spelling mistakes which may devalue the work.